Last edited by Daijinn
Sunday, May 17, 2020 | History

7 edition of Intellectuals and the French Communist Party found in the catalog.

Intellectuals and the French Communist Party

disillusion and decline

by Sudhir Hazareesingh

  • 264 Want to read
  • 30 Currently reading

Published by Clarendon Press, Oxford University Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • France,
  • France.
    • Subjects:
    • Parti communiste français,
    • Communism and intellectuals -- France,
    • France -- Politics and government -- 1945-,
    • France -- Intellectual life -- 20th century

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. [333]-348) and index.

      StatementSudhir Hazareesingh.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsHX528 .H39 1991
      The Physical Object
      Pagination364 p. ;
      Number of Pages364
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL1537732M
      ISBN 100198278705
      LC Control Number91016053

      I mean, if you enter into a relationship with the biggest workers’ party in France, as was said at the time, it’s because you want to enter in contact with workers. You saw Communist intellectuals — or what I’d call bourgeois Communists — or party leaders, but rarely workers, or else those carefully chosen, like at the Congress of Vienna. It is a remarkable fact that some forty years later, the year remains an obligatory point of reference for contemporary politics. In many respects was a annum mirabilis with global political repercussions. The specter of revolution materialized in Peking, Mexico City, New York, Chicago, Berlin, Warsaw, and Prague, where, tragically, hopes for "socialism with a human face" were.

        Even the leaders of the Communist Party in Spain today admit that Nin was murdered on Stalin's orders. Narvich's photographs were used to identify foreign POUM sympathizers. Jodi Dean’s The Communist Horizon comes with the following boldface recommendation from Slavoj Žižek on its back cover: “This is what everyone engaged in today’s struggles for emancipation needs: a unique combination of theoretical stringency and a realistic assessment of our predicament.” The book is part of the Verso “Pocket Communism” series.

      This book explores the relationship between the Cuban Revolution and Western intellectuals and activists during the early days of the Revolution in the s. Analyzing the cases of France, Britain, and the United States, it records the rise and fall of the personal and intellectual attraction that developed between a new generation of. A little while later, the Party delegated Claude Roy, who at the time was still a member, as well as another intellectual whose name I’ve forgotten (they always come in pairs, like cops) to ask me to join a group of intellectuals (communist and non-communist) who were demanding the liberation of Henri Martin, a young sailor who had passed out.


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Intellectuals and the French Communist Party by Sudhir Hazareesingh Download PDF EPUB FB2

In this work, the author examines the emergence and demise of intellectual identification with the French Communist Party between to He argues that, after political conflicts between the party leadership and intellectuals led to an erosion of support, sharpened by wider ideological by: The Mandarin Left.

Communism Intellectuals and the French Communist Party book the French Intellectuals, by David Caute. Macmillan. $ It is well known that the French are among the most intellectual nations of the world—perhaps, even, the most intellectual—and that France is the Western country where Communism has been strongest and most vocal during the last half-century.

Examining the emergence and subsequent demise of intellectual identification with the French Communist Party between andthis book argues that, afterpolitical conflicts between the Communist leadership and party intellectuals led to an erosion of support.

These conflicts were sharpened by the party's institutional decline during the : Sudhir Hazareesingh. Intellectuals and the French Communist Party by Sudhir Hazareesingh,available at Book Depository with free delivery : Sudhir Hazareesingh. Get this from a library.

Intellectuals and the French Communist Party: disillusion and decline. [Sudhir Hazareesingh] -- Examines the emergence and subsequent demise of intellectual identification with the French Communist Party, arguing that, afterpolitical conflicts between the.

The French Communist Party (French: Parti communiste français, PCF ; French pronunciation: [paʁti kɔmynist fʁɑ̃sɛ]) is a communist party in France. Although its electoral support has declined in recent decades, the PCF retains a strong influence in French politics, especially at the local level.

The French Communist Party (French: Parti Communiste Français; abbreviated PCF) has been a part of the political scene in France sincepeaking in strength around the end of World War originated when a majority of members resigned from the socialist French Section of the Workers' International (SFIO) party to set up the French Section of the Communist International (SFIC).

Furet, like many other French intellectuals embued with a leftist activism and an ideological passion dating from the French revolutions of, andturned for a time to communism. A book that is devastating to many of those that modern thinkers hold in high esteem, such as Rousseau, Marx, Tolstoy, Sarte and Brecht.

Johnson knows a lot, has studied a lot, and is willing to call these men (and one woman) what they were: mean, greedy for fame and often money, immoral, hateful towards women and children, and above all persistent liars/5().

This chapter examines the condition and situation of the French Communist intellectuals in the wider tradition of political activity in France.

Though the French Communist Party (PCF) occupied the same terrain as the republican tradition, it was also deep-rooted in Leninist and syndicalist origins, which ensured that the initial political culture of French Communism differed in a number of.

In this work, the author examines the emergence and demise of intellectual identification with the French Communist Party between to He argues that, after political conflicts between the party leadership and intellectuals led to an erosion of support, sharpened by wider ideological changes.

Based on a critical examination of the Price Range: $ - $ The violent collapse of the ecclesiastical caste precipitated by the French Revolution has given rise to the secular intellectual armed with their scintillating rhetoric and dazzling display of scholastic aptitudes; these social, cultural elites have become guardians of cultures and devised moral and ideological innovations, thus replacing the ancient regime of the priestly s: Get this from a library.

Intellectuals and the French communist party: disillusion and decline. [Sudhir Hazareesingh] -- This work examines the emergence and subsequent demise of intellectual identification with the French Communist Party, arguing that after. Examining the emergence and subsequent demise of intellectual identification with the French Communist Party between andSudhir Hazareesingh argues that, afterpolitical conflicts between the Communist leadership and party intellectuals led to an erosion of : Sudhir Hazareesingh.

Political polarization in the U.S. has long favored the use of anti-intellectualism by each political party (Republican and Democratic) to undermine the credibility of the other party with the middle class.

Inthe New Jersey governor, Woodrow Wilson, described the battles of anti-intellectualism: What I fear is a government of experts. Above all, intellectuals have provided the French with a comforting sense of national pride. As the progressive thinker Edgar Quinet put it, with a big dollop of Gallic self-satisfaction: “France’s vocation is to consume herself for the glory of the world, for others as much as for herself, for an ideal which is yet to be attained of humanity and world civilization.”.

French Intellectuals and Communism French Intellectuals and Communism Richard Wolin ▪ Summer There are many who will view Tony Judt’s Past Imperfect as a rearguard action.

After all, the moral condemnation of French intellectuals for their utter credulity about communism in the late s and the early s is about as challenging as shooting fish in a barrel. and World War I veteran in the French Foreign Legion, a self-educated and effi-cient administrator.

He replaced intellectuals such as Boris Souvarine or Claude Calzan who had led the organisation up to then. For the Komintern and the French Communist leaders, both institutions were considered propaganda services rather than publishing houses.

Casanova wrote a book named The Communist Party, the intellectuals, and the nation. Bibliography Edit Philip Robrieux devotes a few pages in his monumental biography of Maurice Thorez (4 volumes) to "The Inside Story of the French Communist Party" (V.2, p.

– and V. 4, p. X he French Communist party has fully recognized the useful-ness of intellectuals. Although it has kept them under suspicion and has preferred to place the more reliable worker in its key positions, intellectuals form probably as much as one-third to one-fourth of the party functionaries and militants.

Some intellectuals fought with or provided support to the Algerians, but opposed the slaughter of French civilians. The atmosphere of rebellion was similar to the WWII resistance.

Intellectuals, Communists and Algeria () French intellectuals were disappointed with the French Communist Party's unwillingness to support Algerian independence.In late a leading French publishing house, Robert Laffont, published Le Livre Noir du Communisme (The Black Book of Communism), an page book of scholarly essays that collectively provide a history of Communism in the 20th century.

The contributors to the book include some of the finest scholars from both East and West, who have drawn extensively on new archival findings.

The Communist Party had to be built from those who had pierced the veil of false consciousness and saw clearly what needed to be done. It wouldn’t simply lead the working class; it would compel the workers toward progress. And the people who could see through false consciousness were the intellectuals, who came to be the leaders of the.